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Marvin F Smith

October 22, 1932 ~ August 16, 2018 (age 85)
Marvin F. Smith, 85, of Aberdeen passed away on August 16, 2018 at Bayshore Medical Center. He was the son of Helen and Marvin Smith and lived in West Orange, NJ. He attended Newark College of Engineering and graduated in 1954 where he was a member of the Engineering Honor Society Fraternity (Tau Beta Pi) and was also president of his senior class. Marvin graduated with a BSChE degree.
Marvin was employed by the DuPont Co, in Newark, DE, but left to serve in the US Army from 1955 to 1957, later returning to DuPont. Later, he took a position with the Bon Ami Co. in NYC and from 1964 to 1992 was employed by Exxon Research & Engineering Co. and Exxon Chemical Co. in Linden, NJ. While at Exxon, he became a member of ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) and received an appreciation award in 1988 and in 1993 an award of merit and honorary title of fellow. In addition, Marvin was a member of the Society of Automotive Engineers and was written up in the publication, Who’s Who in Science and Engineering.
He was an avid tennis player for many years, competing in senior singles competition in national and regional tennis tournaments.
His first love was spending time with his family.
Marvin is survived by Jacqueline, his wife of 59 years and son Scott, both of Aberdeen; his sister, Marian Blackwell of Titusville, FL and several nieces, nephews, great-nieces and nephews and cousins.
Family and friends may visit the Bedle Funeral Home, 212 Main St., Matawan on Monday, August 20th from 11am to 11:30am. A funeral service will take place at 11:30am, followed by burial at Marlboro Cemetery at 1pm.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Marvin’s memory to either Matawan United Methodist Church, Atlantic Ave. & Church St., Aberdeen, NJ 07747 or Wounded Warriors. Memories and condolences may be shared at www.bedlefuneralhomes.com.
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